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IJAT Vol.10 No.5 pp. 804-812
doi: 10.20965/ijat.2016.p0804
(2016)

Paper:

High Efficiency Machining for Integral Shaping from Simplicity Materials Using Five-Axis Machine Tools

Makoto Yamada, Tsukasa Kondo, and Kai Wakasa

National Institute of Technology Hakodate College
14-1 Tokura-cho, Hakodate-shi, Hokkaido 042-8501, Japan

Corresponding author

Received:
April 7, 2016
Accepted:
July 21, 2016
Published:
September 5, 2016
Keywords:
integrally shaping, five-axis machine tools, 3+2 axis controlled machining, voxel model, high efficiency rough cutting, complete convex shape
Abstract

In the integrally shaping process from a simple material shape to an objective shape, it is necessary to reduce the time required for the machining process in order to improve cost savings and the effectiveness of mass production. For the purpose of achieving high efficiency in the integral shaping from simplicity materials, we have focused on a rough cutting process that requires the most time in the manufacturing process. The purpose of this research is to propose a method for realizing high-speed rough machining using five-axis machine tools with a voxel model, and confirm the high efficiency of the rough cutting. In this research, we use five-axis controlled machine tools for material machining, and suggest two machining methods for the rough cutting process using the voxel model. The first method derives the tool posture where the cutting removal quantity becomes the maximum; this method also carries out a rough cutting process via 3+2 axis controlled machining. The other method carries a complete convex shape that includes the required shape, and simultaneously machines via five-axis machining based on the complete convex shape. This paper demonstrates the 3+2 axis control machining method that uses the voxel model to perform the rough machining process with high efficiency, and the simultaneous five-axis control machining method that uses a complete convex shape model for rough machining. We confirm the results with a computer simulation and actual machining experiments.

Cite this article as:
M. Yamada, T. Kondo, and K. Wakasa, “High Efficiency Machining for Integral Shaping from Simplicity Materials Using Five-Axis Machine Tools,” Int. J. Automation Technol., Vol.10, No.5, pp. 804-812, 2016.
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Last updated on Dec. 11, 2018