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IJAT Vol.8 No.4 pp. 539-549
doi: 10.20965/ijat.2014.p0539
(2014)

Paper:

Method to Control Manufacturing Cell by Driving Simulation Model

Hironori Hibino

Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510, Japan

Received:
December 25, 2013
Accepted:
June 17, 2014
Published:
July 5, 2014
Keywords:
simulation, model driven, manufacturing cell control, industrial network middleware, PC based control, engineering process
Abstract

In this paper, a method to Control a Manufacturing Cell by Driving Simulation Models (CMC-DSM) is proposed. The purposes of CMC-DSM is not only to directly operate the manufacturing cell while controlling and monitoring the manufacturing cell based on a simulation model in the manufacturing system execution phase, but also to support the manufacturing engineering processes based on the simulation model. In the manufacturing engineering processes, the simulation model is mixed and synchronized with real equipment and management applications in the case where parts of equipment and manufacturing management applications are not provided in the manufacturing cell. In the manufacturing system execution phase, when the simulation model acts in response to manufacturing system behaviors, the manufacturing system is controlled by synchronizing the simulation model behaviors. In this paper, the Environment required to Control a Manufacturing Cell by Driving Simulation Models (E-CMC-DSM) is proposed. The necessary functions for E-CMC-DSM are defined and developed. E-CMC-DSM consists of a simulator developed to drive simulation models (EMU), a soft-wiring system developed in this study, and a semi-standard industrial network middleware. The validation of ECMC-DSM was carried out through a case study.

Cite this article as:
H. Hibino, “Method to Control Manufacturing Cell by Driving Simulation Model,” Int. J. Automation Technol., Vol.8, No.4, pp. 539-549, 2014.
Data files:
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