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IJAT Vol.4 No.1 pp. 26-32
doi: 10.20965/ijat.2010.p0026
(2010)

Paper:

Automation of Deburring by a Material-Handling Robot —Generation of a Deburring Path Based on a Characteristic Model—

Naoki Asakawa, Fumitake Saegusa, and Masatoshi Hirao

Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Institute of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192, Japan

Received:
October 13, 2009
Accepted:
November 9, 2009
Published:
January 5, 2010
Keywords:
industrial robot, deburring, CAD, CAM, material handling
Abstract

This study deals with the automation of deburring in press working using a material-handling robot. The robot simultaneously manipulates and deburrs a workpiece using robot control commands automatically generated. Robot control commands are generated based on environmental information — positioning of carry-in/carry-out table, tool and end effector dimensions — and CAD data using a “characteristic model” to realize robot operation suiting the working environment. The results of experiments confirm the proposal’s effectiveness in automatic deburring and material handling.

Cite this article as:
N. Asakawa, F. Saegusa, and M. Hirao, “Automation of Deburring by a Material-Handling Robot —Generation of a Deburring Path Based on a Characteristic Model—,” Int. J. Automation Technol., Vol.4, No.1, pp. 26-32, 2010.
Data files:
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Last updated on Nov. 18, 2019