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JRM Vol.35 No.5 pp. 1185-1192
doi: 10.20965/jrm.2023.p1185
(2023)

Paper:

Development of Cell Micropatterning Technique Using Laser Processing of Alginate Gel

Haruhiko Takemoto*1, Keito Sonoda*1, Kanae Ike*2, Yoichi Saito*3 ORCID Icon, Yoshitaka Nakanishi*3,*4 ORCID Icon, and Yuta Nakashima*3,*4,*5,*6,† ORCID Icon

*1Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University
2-39-1 Kurokami, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto, Kumamoto 806-8555, Japan

*2Faculty of Engineering, Kumamoto University
2-39-1 Kurokami, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto, Kumamoto 806-8555, Japan

*3Faculty of Advanced Science and Technology, Kumamoto University
2-39-1 Kurokami, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto, Kumamoto 806-8555, Japan

*4Institute of Industrial Nanomaterials, Kumamoto University
2-39-1 Kurokami, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto, Kumamoto 806-8555, Japan

*5International Research Organization for Advanced Science and Technology, Kumamoto University
2-39-1 Kurokami, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto, Kumamoto 806-8555, Japan

*6Fusion Oriented Research for Disruptive Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency
5-3 Yonbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8666, Japan

Corresponding author

Received:
May 8, 2023
Accepted:
July 20, 2023
Published:
October 20, 2023
Keywords:
cell micropatterning, alginate thin film, laser processing
Abstract

Tissue formation from heterogeneous cell types, similar to those in vivo, is an important technique for development of new drugs and formation of artificial organs. In vivo tissues are complex arrangements of heterogeneous cells that interact with each other. To create such tissues in vitro, it is essential to develop a technique that arranges heterogeneous cells in an arbitrary configuration. Currently, we are developing a new gel patterning technique to create effective cell micropatterns by using photolithography and alginate gel, which inhibits cellular adhesion. In this study, we considered that a more flexible gel patterning technique was required for creating order-made formations of complex tissues. We created gel patterns by removing the alginate gel using laser processing, and cells were cultured on the formed patterns. Complex heterogeneous cell patterns were achieved by adjusting various technical parameters such as the laser power, spot diameter, and alginate gel film thickness. Based on our results, we anticipate that our technique will prove useful for the development of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

Procedure of gel and cell micropattern

Procedure of gel and cell micropattern

Cite this article as:
H. Takemoto, K. Sonoda, K. Ike, Y. Saito, Y. Nakanishi, and Y. Nakashima, “Development of Cell Micropatterning Technique Using Laser Processing of Alginate Gel,” J. Robot. Mechatron., Vol.35 No.5, pp. 1185-1192, 2023.
Data files:
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