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JRM Vol.32 No.6 pp. 1104-1111
doi: 10.20965/jrm.2020.p1104
(2020)

Review:

Tsukuba Challenge 2019: Task Settings and Experimental Results

Yoshitaka Hara*1, Tetsuo Tomizawa*2, Hisashi Date*3, Yoji Kuroda*4, and Takashi Tsubouchi*3

*1Future Robotics Technology Center (fuRo), Chiba Institute of Technology
2-17-1 Tsudanuma, Narashino, Chiba 275-0016, Japan

*2Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Tokyo College
1220-2 Kunugida, Hachioji, Tokyo 193-0942, Japan

*3Faculty of Engineering, Information and Systems, University of Tsukuba
1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573, Japan

*4School of Science and Technology, Meiji University
1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571, Japan

Received:
November 4, 2020
Accepted:
November 12, 2020
Published:
December 20, 2020
Keywords:
Tsukuba Challenge, autonomous navigation, real world, practices and perspectives
Abstract
Tsukuba Challenge 2019: Task Settings and Experimental Results

Group photograph taken after the closing ceremony of the final experiment

This paper overviews Tsukuba Challenge 2019. The Tsukuba Challenge is an experiment for autonomous navigation of mobile robots on public walkways. Navigation tasks through pedestrian paths in the city are given. Participating teams develop their own robot hardware and software. We describe the aim of the task settings and the analysis of the experimental results for all the teams. We studied the records of real-world experiments of Tsukuba Challenge 2019.

Cite this article as:
Yoshitaka Hara, Tetsuo Tomizawa, Hisashi Date, Yoji Kuroda, and Takashi Tsubouchi, “Tsukuba Challenge 2019: Task Settings and Experimental Results,” J. Robot. Mechatron., Vol.32, No.6, pp. 1104-1111, 2020.
Data files:
References
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Last updated on May. 04, 2021