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JRM Vol.29 No.6 pp. 952-956
doi: 10.20965/jrm.2017.p0952
(2017)

Review:

Trends of Technology Education in Compulsory Education in Japan

Hiroyuki Muramatsu

Institute of Education, Academic Assembly, Shinshu University
6 Nishinagano, Nagano 380-8544, Japan

Received:
September 14, 2017
Accepted:
October 18, 2017
Published:
December 20, 2017
Keywords:
technology education, compulsory education, robot-using education, programming education
Abstract
Trends of Technology Education in Compulsory Education in Japan

Examples of technology education in the world

If we look at an overview of technology education in the world, we realize that technology education in professional education, as well as in ordinary education, plays an important role in supporting the idea of a technology-intensive Japan. This study focused on the trend of technology education in compulsory education in Japan. Compared to technology education in advanced countries, fewer class hours are spent on technology education in compulsory education in Japan. However, various attempts have been made with robots and programming, mostly under the subject “technology and home economics,” at junior high schools. In particular, the future development of programming education implementation can be expected. At the same time, schools face multiple problems, including class hours and a lack of full-time teachers. These problems must be solved to enhance technology education.

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Last updated on Apr. 24, 2018