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JRM Vol.22 No.5 pp. 631-638
doi: 10.20965/jrm.2010.p0631
(2010)

Paper:

Optical Adhesion Control of Hydrogel Microtools for On-Demand Immobilization and Measurement of Cells on a Microfluidic Chip

Hisataka Maruyama*, Toshio Fukuda**, and Fumihito Arai*

*Department of Bioengineering and Robotics, Tohoku University, 6-6-01 Aramaki Aza Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579, Japan

**Department of Micro-Nano Systems Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603, Japan

Received:
February 20, 2010
Accepted:
August 3, 2010
Published:
October 20, 2010
Keywords:
adhesion, immobilization, measurement, photo irradiation, microtool
Abstract

Optical adhesion control of hydrogel microtools, made of hydrophilic photo-crosslinkable resin, was developed for on-demand immobilization and measurement of cells on a microfluidic chip. The hydrogel microtool was manipulated by optical tweezers and modified by spiropyran chromospheres, which was a photochromic polymer. We developed on-demand control of uni/bidirectional adhesiveness of the microtool by control of electrolyte concentration in a solution. Photo illumination controls the adhesiveness of the microtools. In case of unidirectional control of adhesiveness, the microtools adhere to glass, other microtools and cells by illumination of ultraviolet (UV) light. Spiropyran chromospheres were used for bidirectional control of adhesiveness to cell. In case of bidirectional control of adhesiveness, the microtools adhere to cells by UV illumination. On the other hand, the microtool detaches from the adhered cells by visible (VIS) light illumination. Electrolyte concentration in the solution controlled these adhesiveness controls. Adherence of the microtool was enough to keep its position on a microfluidic chip. We applied these immobilization methods to measure the local conditions around cells by modifying the microtool with a pH indicator, bromothymol blue (BTB). Local measurements of the ambient pH value of yeast cells were performed by immobilizing the cell on the surface of the pH sensing microtool. Moreover, culture monitoring of a single yeast cell was demonstrated by immobilization to the microtool.

Cite this article as:
Hisataka Maruyama, Toshio Fukuda, and Fumihito Arai, “Optical Adhesion Control of Hydrogel Microtools for On-Demand Immobilization and Measurement of Cells on a Microfluidic Chip,” J. Robot. Mechatron., Vol.22, No.5, pp. 631-638, 2010.
Data files:
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