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JDR Vol.15 No.2 pp. 106-111
(2020)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2020.p0106

Review:

Five-Year Achievements of Volcano Program Promotion Panel

Takahiro Ohkura*,† and Kenji Nogami**

*Aso Volcanological Laboratory, Institute for Geothermal Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University
3028 Ichinomiyamachisakanashi, Aso, Kumamoto 869-2611, Japan

Corresponding author

**Volcanic Fluid Research Center, School of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Gunma, Japan

Received:
November 25, 2019
Accepted:
December 4, 2019
Published:
March 20, 2020
Keywords:
disaster mitigation, volcanic event tree improvement, branching conditions of volcanic activity, low-frequency and large-scale volcanic phenomena
Abstract

To mitigate a volcanic eruption disaster, it is important to forecast the transition of the disaster, which depends on the stage of the volcanic phenomena, in addition to forecasting the site, scale, and time of the volcanic activities. To make such forecasts, it is critical to elucidate the evolution of volcanic activity. Accordingly, the Volcano Program Promotion Panel has set the prioritized target as “to forecast volcanic eruption as a cause of disaster by clarifying the branching conditions and theories of volcanic activity and improving volcanic event tree.” The panel promoted a five-year study on the elucidation of volcanic phenomena, including low-frequency and large-scale ones, status of volcanic eruption fields, volcanic eruption modeling, observation method development, and observation system improvement. In this paper, an outline of the main results of this five-year study is presented.

Cite this article as:
T. Ohkura and K. Nogami, “Five-Year Achievements of Volcano Program Promotion Panel,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.15, No.2, pp. 106-111, 2020.
Data files:
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Last updated on Aug. 09, 2020