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JACIII Vol.26 No.5 pp. 784-791
doi: 10.20965/jaciii.2022.p0784
(2022)

Paper:

Analysis of State Transition of COVID-19 Positive Cases in Tokyo, Japan and its Application to Agent Simulation

Yasufumi Takama

Tokyo Metropolitan University
6-6 Asahigaoka, Hino-shi, Tokyo 191-0065, Japan

Received:
March 2, 2022
Accepted:
June 21, 2022
Published:
September 20, 2022
Keywords:
COVID-19, agent simulation, data mining
Abstract
Analysis of State Transition of COVID-19 Positive Cases in Tokyo, Japan and its Application to Agent Simulation

Simulation result: August 2020

This paper estimates the state transition of COVID-19 positive cases by analyzing the data about confirmed positive cases in Tokyo, Japan. The prediction of the number of newly infected persons is one of the active research topics for the COVID-19 pandemic. Although such a prediction is important for recognizing the future risk of spreading infectious diseases, understanding the state transition after they are confirmed to be positive is also important for estimating the number of required ICUs, hotel rooms for isolation, etc. This paper classifies the state after being positive into “in hotel/home for isolation,” “in hospital with a mild state,” “in hospital with a severe state,” “recovered,” and “dead” and estimates the transition probabilities among those states from the data about confirmed positive cases in Tokyo, Japan. This paper shows the parameters estimated from different periods and discusses the difference considering the pandemic situation. An agent simulation using the estimated transition probabilities as its parameters is also proposed. The result of the simulation from August to November 2020 shows the predicted number of agents is close to the actual data. As one of the possible applications to the proposed agent simulation, this paper shows the simulation result from December 2020 to January 2021 under a hypothetical situation.

Cite this article as:
Y. Takama, “Analysis of State Transition of COVID-19 Positive Cases in Tokyo, Japan and its Application to Agent Simulation,” J. Adv. Comput. Intell. Intell. Inform., Vol.26, No.5, pp. 784-791, 2022.
Data files:
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Last updated on Sep. 22, 2022