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IJAT Vol.16 No.3 pp. 356-366
doi: 10.20965/ijat.2022.p0356
(2022)

Paper:

Improved Synchronous Motion of Linear and Rotary Axes While Avoiding Torque Saturation Under a Constant Feed Speed Vector at the Endmilling Point – Investigation of Motion Error Under Numerical Control Commanded Motion –

Takamaru Suzuki*,†, Kazuki Yoshikawa**, Toshiki Hirogaki**, Eiichi Aoyama**, and Takakazu Ikegami***

*Machine Systems Engineering Course, Department of Creative Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Kitakyushu College
5-20-1 Shii, Kokuraminami-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 802-0985, Japan

Corresponding author

**Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Japan

***DMG MORI Co., Ltd., Yamatokoriyama, Japan

Received:
October 5, 2021
Accepted:
December 1, 2021
Published:
May 5, 2022
Keywords:
five-axis machining center, synchronous motion, machined shape error, servo, torque saturation
Abstract

A five-axis machining center is known for its synchronous control capability, allowing complicated three-dimensional surfaces, such as propellers and hypoid gears, to be quickly created. Prior research has shown that it is necessary to improve not only the machined shape accuracy but also the machined surface roughness of free-form surfaces. Therefore, in this research, we aimed to maintain the feed speed vector at the endmilling point by controlling two linear axes and a rotary axis with a five-axis machining center to improve the machined surface quality. In previous research, we suggested reducing the shape error of machined workpieces (referred to as shape error in this research) by considering the differences in the servo characteristics of the three axes in the machining method. The shape error was significantly decreased by applying the proposed method, which uses a parameter (referred to as precedent control coefficient in this research) determined by calculation, rather than trial and error. Moreover, to maintain the feed speed vector at the endmilling point when machining complex shapes, a rapid velocity change in each axis is required, causing inaccuracy owing to torque saturation. The results of the experiments and simulations of previous research indicated that torque saturation can be evaluated via simulation. In this research, to reduce the shape error while avoiding torque saturation when movement has high angular velocity, we developed a theoretical method to obtain the most suitable precedent control coefficient of each axis by using a block diagram that considers torque saturation. Therefore, both shape error reduction and torque saturation avoidance can be realized by using the proposed method.

Cite this article as:
Takamaru Suzuki, Kazuki Yoshikawa, Toshiki Hirogaki, Eiichi Aoyama, and Takakazu Ikegami, “Improved Synchronous Motion of Linear and Rotary Axes While Avoiding Torque Saturation Under a Constant Feed Speed Vector at the Endmilling Point – Investigation of Motion Error Under Numerical Control Commanded Motion –,” Int. J. Automation Technol., Vol.16, No.3, pp. 356-366, 2022.
Data files:
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Last updated on May. 20, 2022