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IJAT Vol.6 No.5 pp. 648-653
doi: 10.20965/ijat.2012.p0648
(2012)

Paper:

Tool Posture Planning Method for Continuous Multi Axis Control Machining with Consideration of Shortening Shank Length of End Mill

Jun’ichi Kaneko and Kenichiro Horio

Production and Processing Laboratory, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Ohkubo, Sakura-Ku, Saitama City, Saitama 338-8570, Japan

Received:
February 21, 2012
Accepted:
May 2, 2012
Published:
September 5, 2012
Keywords:
CAM, multi-axis control, tool posture, shank length, GPGPU
Abstract

In recent multiaxis-controlled machine tools, a new planning method to keep continuous motion on rotational axes and tool setting with short shank length from tool holder end is required to realize both high productivity and fine surface. This paper propose a new planning method consisting of a temporary search of new tool posture based on estimation of the required shank length and the gradual optimization process of motion on rotational axes. The proposed method repeats the following three planning steps: the estimation of interference between the cutting tool and workpiece, the search for a new tool posture to avoid interference and the re-planning of tool posture changes to prevent rapid motion on rotational axes. By repeating these steps many times, continuous change can be gradually realized in rotational axes without interference.

Cite this article as:
J. Kaneko and K. Horio, “Tool Posture Planning Method for Continuous Multi Axis Control Machining with Consideration of Shortening Shank Length of End Mill,” Int. J. Automation Technol., Vol.6, No.5, pp. 648-653, 2012.
Data files:
References
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Last updated on Nov. 18, 2019