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JRM Vol.32 No.1 pp. 128-135
doi: 10.20965/jrm.2020.p0128
(2020)

Review:

Survey of Social Touch Interaction Between Humans and Robots

Masahiro Shiomi*, Hidenobu Sumioka*, and Hiroshi Ishiguro*,**

*Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International (ATR)
2-2-2 Hikaridai, Seika-cho, Soraku-gun, Kyoto 619-0288, Japan

**Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University
1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531, Japan

Received:
November 15, 2019
Accepted:
December 24, 2019
Published:
February 20, 2020
Keywords:
social touch, human-robot interaction
Abstract
Survey of Social Touch Interaction Between Humans and Robots

A child being hugged by a robot

In human-human interaction, social touch provides several merits, from both physical and mental perspectives. The physical existence of robots helps them reproduce human-like social touch, during their interaction with people. Such social touch shows positive effects, similar to those observed in human-human interaction. Therefore, social touch is a growing research topic in the field of human-robot interaction. This survey provides an overview of the work conducted so far on this topic.

Cite this article as:
M. Shiomi, H. Sumioka, and H. Ishiguro, “Survey of Social Touch Interaction Between Humans and Robots,” J. Robot. Mechatron., Vol.32, No.1, pp. 128-135, 2020.
Data files:
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