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JRM Vol.14 No.6 pp. 597-603
doi: 10.20965/jrm.2002.p0597
(2002)

Paper:

Development and Muscle Strength Training Evaluation for Horseback Riding Therapeutic Equipment

Youichi Shinomiya*, Shuoyu Wang**, Kenji Ishida*** and Tetsuhiko Kimura****

*Advanced Technology Research Laboratory, Matsushita Electric Works, Ltd.

**Department of Intelligent Mechanical Systems Engineering, Kochi University of Technology

***Rehabilitation Center, Kochi Medical School

****Department of Health Service Administration, Nippon Medical School

Received:
March 3, 2002
Accepted:
August 20, 2002
Published:
December 20, 2002
Keywords:
horseback riding therapy, elderly people, low back pain, muscular strength training, home fitness
Abstract

This paper describes the development of a horseback riding therapeutic equipment that is capable of evaluating muscular strength training. The characteristic of the developed equipment is a simple movement which is enough to experience the feeling of horse-riding and also is possible to effectively muscular discharge. This has been extracted from our system which can reproduce saddle movement by using data collected three dimensional from living horse. During trials, long-term usage of the developed equipment results in the good result on the extension and flexion force of trunk and knee joint in elderly individuals. For preventing low back pain resulting from assuming undesirable postures, it is recommended to train the abdominal and back muscles. Horseback riding therapy is expected to be effective in increasing muscular strength. Attempts have been made to develop a mechanical system comparable to horseback riding therapy.

Cite this article as:
Youichi Shinomiya, Shuoyu Wang, Kenji Ishida, and Tetsuhiko Kimura, “Development and Muscle Strength Training Evaluation for Horseback Riding Therapeutic Equipment,” J. Robot. Mechatron., Vol.14, No.6, pp. 597-603, 2002.
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Last updated on Oct. 22, 2021